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of the law and rev lauelations on the nsa program that can spy on everything you do online and i mean everything and the nixon you haven't seen until now. footage hidden for the last 40 years. tonight i'll talk to the other nixon, the 83-year-old brother ed. >>> i want to begin with ariel castro said to make a statement tomorrow. pamela brown spoke to castro's sister today and joins me now. pamela, i poured through the new documentation that's been released this evening, very, very disturbing revolutions. much of it based on diaries from the three poor women held captive by ariel castro. tell me about that. >> reporter: yeah, that's right. you remember all the counts, more than 900 counts ariel castro faced and specific with the dates. we're learning that prosecutors actually used these women's diaries to help them document all the different charges. according to these documents that the prosecutor's office released today, the women over the past ten years got through their time in captivity by keeping diaries and writing about abuse they experienced and their dreams of getting out so
to reign in the secret government. today senators from both parties grilled officials from the fbi and nsa about the lack of transparency around the nation's sprawling surveillance operation. signalling the defunding of the nsa's phone records. they will force the government to reveal how many americans have had their information reviewed by federal agents. this as president obama on the hill today, assured lawmakers he was hearing their concerns about the reach of the nsa and even agreed to meet with a number of them at the white house tomorrow. today meetings came just hours after the administration announced they would be declassifying the now infamous secret court order compelling verizon to hand over all their american customer's phone records in bulk. that was edward snowden's first revelation, the one that kicked this whole thing off. today we got his latest. the piece published by glenn greenwald, with documents provided by snowden, details another nsa surveillance program, a top secret national security agency program that allows analysts to search with no prior authorization thro
former intelligence colleagues like the nsa are under attack. the fact that they are leaning forward and releasing it the nsa was the source of this, it does smell as if politics was involved here regrettably. >> 100 prisoners have been recaptured after the 1100 escaped in libya, by the way. that happened late today. we have got a lot of other prisoners to track down though. it's good to see you, chad. >> you, too laura. >> laura: next on the rundown did, president obama play down the terror threat during the 2012 campaign for political reasons? we have a debate. later, does new jersey governor chris christie give new jersey best chance to beat hillary clinton. both sighs will weigh in when we come back. ♪ right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build
and mukasey is right. it is disturbing that at a time that when my former intelligence colleagues like the nsa are under attack. the fact that they are leaning forward and releasing it the nsa was the source of this, it does smell as if politics was involved here regrettably. >> 100 prisoners have been recaptured after the 1100 escaped in libya, by the way. that happened late today. we have got a lot of other prisoners to track down though. it's good to see you, chad. >> you, too laura. >> laura: next on the rundown did, president obama play down the terror threat during the 2012 campaign for political reasons? we have a debate. later, does new jersey governor chris christie give new jersey best chance to beat hillary clinton. both sighs will weigh in when we come back. good job! still running in the morning? yeah. getting your vegetables every day? when i can. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. two full servings of vegetables for only 50 delicious calories. little things anyone can do. it steals your memories. your independence. ensures support, a breakthrough. and sooner than you'
about her recovery. also where her head and heart are now in the 8:00 hour. >>> also new the nsa breaking the rules when it comes to your privacy. the agency violated privacy regulations thousands of times each year, this according to an internal audit of documents obtained by "the washington post" from none other than nsa leaker edward snowden. white house correspondent dan lothian is live from martha's vineyard this morning. dan, sounds like there are more big questions for the administration today. >> reporter: that's right, certainly more big questions, kate. you know "the washington post" revealing in this report that the lechl of detail and analysis they uncovered is usually more than typically shared with member of congress or the fisa court that oversees the nation's surveillance programs. >> a general impression has i think taken hold not only among the american public but also around the world that somehow we're out there willy-nilly. >> reporter: that was president obama just days ago assuring the american public that the national security agency was not breaching the
earlier this year, so he still faces the possibility of being returned to jail. >>> the nsa surveillance network can reportedly see about 75% of all u.s. internet traffic. this is according to this report out today in the "wall street journal." they've been investigating. so this report says that the nsa sometimes keeps the content of e-mails between u.s. citizens and then filters some domestic phone calls that use internet connections. the nsa has recently stated that it only, and their word is touches, touches 1.6% of the world's internet data. john jo joe johns, let me bring you in on this one from washington. what does this "wall street journal" report tell us as far as how the nsa is filtering e-mail and internet traffic? >> it sounds like nsa has a second shot. some of this we already knew. the nsa asks the telecommunications companies, brooke, to give it streams of traffic that the telecom company reasonably believes to contain foreign intelligence information. by the way, that's not everything that happens on the internet or on telephones. but it's still a lot of information. the
, but in a report today is saying very much otherwise. "the new york times" reporting the nsa is searching e-mails and text messages sent to and from the united states. combine that with news the irs was altering details of investigations done by the drug enforcement adminisation, and my next guess says american civil liberties are under attack. seems like every other day there's a new development in the nsa, the snooping, the violation of the fourth amendment. talk to us about this new one where the nsa admits if an e-mail sent to and from, they're going look into the e-mail text, the text of the messages. >> looking at the text, looking at the met -- metta data. the obama administration released an internal report saying hundreds of millions of americans have had their stuff looked through and the foreign intelligence surveillance court toll the nsa to knock it off or they were violating things too regularly. to have obama in that next week say, oh, there's no domestic spying program, it shows not just his own kind of problem with voracity, these people operated without any control for so
un headquarters. here with the reaction crisis tails which the nsa may want to read to figure out how to handle this crisis and from the american center on law and crisis. welcome to targeting conservatives it's actually refreshing, lanny, that we're going after the bad guys. i like that we're spying on our enemies at the u.n. but it's too stupid they got caught. that's the only criticism i have. i like that they're doing it. >> sean, let me remind you that i was a member of president bush's privacy and civility oversight board. i was read into the surveillance program along with ted olson, there were five of us who got to know about that program. when i was done watching and observing what we were doing to prevent another 9/11, i said to then the director of the nsa, great man, general mike hayden, if anything general hayden -- there are so many hoops and checks and balances and legal concerns about approaching fourth amendment rights that we may miss the bad guys who are going to hit us again so i am a supporter of what i think is a great agency with a lot of great people, sometimes
. >>> good evening, from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in" nsa leaker edward snowden leaves the moscow airport behind and enters russia with temporary asylum. what does it mean for his future? and for the already tense, fraught relationship between the united states and russia? >>> also tonight, you probably know who this tony bennett is, but there's another tony bennett who should be way more famous than he already is. thanks to an outrageous story of apparent corruption that you need to know about. >>> plus, mitch mcconnell has long lived by the old adage, slow and steady wins the race, but news out of kentucky should make the republican senate leader, too slow and very, very unsteady. >>> we begin tonight with a story that i honestly and frankly did not think would be topping our broadcast. today ariel castro was was sentenced to life in prison plus 1,000 years after pleading guilty to 937 counts including rape and kidnapping of three women, two of whom an suggested as teenagers and one of whom gave birth to his daughter during captivity. this may have been a routine proc
, senator leahy, who said wait a minute, i know the nsa tells us 54 plots in one way or another have been thwarted because of the program senator chambliss is referring to, he says that's a bit of an overstatement, and he said it in open testimony this week. listen. >> what i said in open testimony is that section 215, to thwart or prevent 54 terrorist plots. not by any stretch can you get 54 terrorist plots. this program is not effective. it has to end. so far i'm not convinced by what i've seen. >> do you agree with that? >> we had a meeting in the white house. saxby and i attended it with the president. there were about ten of us, democrats and republicans, from the house and the senate, and we spent an hour and a half with the president in the oval office, an hour and a half going over this nsa, debating it back and forth. the nsa 215 program that we're talking about here is a program on domestic surveillance. in other words, do we need to collect all of the phone records of all of the people living in america for five years so that if we're going to target one particular person we're
on ordinary people. >> also, did the president mislead the american people on the nsa scandal? the spy agency now commits it broke privacy rules thousands of times a year. have they been spying on you? he we will have a factor investigation. >> the first thing that happened to me at the hotel is i got escorted out. [ laughter ] >> why? >> i think it was a facial profiling deal. >> laura: the star of the hit series duck dynasty is thrown out of a new york city hotel because of the way he looked. wait until you hear him tell the story. >> you look like this, you can't hide. >> caution. you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. ♪ ♪ >> laura: hello, everyone. i'm laura ingraham in for bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. why duck dynasty is a winner. that's the subject of this evening's talking points memo. unless you have been living under a rock for the past year, you have heard about a and e's reality show the mega hit duck dynasty. the series follows a wildly successful family-run company in louisiana that manufactures duck calls. on wednesday, the sh
allows the nsa analysts to collect nearly everything a user does on the internet. that includes personal e-mails, on line chats, web searches and social media activity like facebook chats and private messages. and according to training materials, slides released today. it seems that all an analyst needs to get started is a personal e-mail address or ip address. the guardian x key score collects so much information, though, it can only be stored for three to five days. one nsa report from 2007 estimated that there were 850 billion call events collected. and stored in the nsa data bases. and close to 150 billion internet records, each day. the document says one to two billion records were added according to the guardian. today, the white house said that not all of the information in the guardian piece today is true. >> the intelligence community has explained allegations of widespread unchecked access to information are false. access to tools is limited to only personnel who are required access for their assigned tasks. and there are multiple supervisory checks for those in the system who
was questioned about the nsa, benghazi, russia, and immigration reform. he was most passionate when attacking republicans over obamacare. >> at least they used to say, we'll replace it with something better. there is not even a pretense now that they'll replace it with something better. the notion is simply that those 30 million people, or the 150 million benefiting from the other aspects of affordable care will be better off without it. >> joining us now, the co-host of the five, dana perino. you used to be press secretary for president bush. and after his press conference you would give him a critique. you would go into the oval office. he would try get to you to leave because you're very, very annoying. there's you. you look very different. what did you do? what would you tell president obama if you were going to the oval office about this particular press conference? >> well, a trip down memory lane. i love press conference day. i love to prepare for a press conference i love to prepare somebody else to answer questions. then afterwards, i would usually go in and say, well, sir, i thought
beginning 9:00 a.m. eastern. >>> nsa's top secret surveillance programs under fire. president obama and a bipartisan group of lawmakers are going to hold a closed door meeting at the white house to discuss privacy as another edward snowden bomb shell is dropped detailing how much the intelligence agency is spying or could be spying on your internet activities. barbara starr with more on this. new revelations. how is the administration responding to it this time? >> this meeting at the white house may be a sign that the administration is willing to change the program but is not going to give up on it. the obama administration under attack for its surveillance programs. national security agency director keith alexander heckled. >> i haven't lied to congress. >> reporter: while congress questions is the nsa spying on us. who is accountable for edward snowden's leaks? >> anyone asked to resign or offered to resign? >> no one. >> reporter: the administration declassified more documents in an effort to show the surveillance is vital to national security. even as a new article unveiled mor
the next shoe to drop is. i'm martha maccallum. the nsa reportedly intercepted calls from americans on american soil. many times they say it was by accident. sometimes an area code was a mix-up between egypt and washington, d.c. but either way, when these mistakes were made, although we've been told that the government tried to be as transparent as possible, nobody was told that those mistakes were made and the information that we got in this report from the "washington post" last night comes from edward snowden, the man who leaked the initial information about the nsa program and now has temporary asylum in russia. bill: funny how that works, huh? senior white house foreign affairs correspondent wendell goler is on vacation with the president at martha's vineyard. actually wendell's working. the president is on vacation. what's the white house saying about this, wendell? >> reporter: the white house appears to have been blindsided by this sorry. officials are referring reporters to the national security agency and to senate intelligence committee chair dianne feinstein who says in
if they would actually recognize a missing kid. wait until you see what happens. >>> plus, once again, the nsa under fire. this time for reportedly breaking privacy rules concerning your e-mails and your phone calls. stay right here. a fiery debate over your privacy, next. here we honor the proud thaccomplishmentsss. of our students and alumni. people like, maria salazar, an executive director at american red cross. or garlin smith, video account director at yahoo. and for every garlin, thousands more are hired by hundreds of top companies. each expanding the influence of our proud university of phoenix network. that's right, university of phoenix. enroll now. we've got a frame waiting for you. [announcer] there's no hiding the beneful baked delights.from new heartfuls are made with real bacon... ...and oven-baked to crisp perfection. new heartfuls from beneful baked delights. see, i knew testosterone could affect sex drive, but not energy or even my mood. that's when i talked with my doctor. he gave me some blood tests... showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number. [ male announcer ] tod
lowest bid, it should be best value. >> reporter: controversy continuing over the nsa data mining, former u.n. ambassador says there doesn't seem to be a problem as long as the antennas are going out, not in. >> this is what intelligence is supposed to do, we spy on foreigners. i think the greatest criticism one scan make of foreign intelligence gathering is that there's not enough of it. >> reporter: next week marks the end of the holy month of ramadan when there's usually increase of attacks in war zones, nothing like the wide area u.s. embassies will close. >> wendell goler from the white house, thanks. >>> as wendell reported, closing several embassies at the same time is rare. it happened in march of 2003 in some gulf countries over protesters against the invasion of iraq. in september of 2002, nine embassies closed on the eve of the first anniversary of 9/11. a year and a half earlier, four facilities in south america were shut down because of security concerns. and in 1999, six embassies in africa were closed also for security reasons. >>> now from preventing a terror strike to cl
night. >>> tonight, the nsa is claiming credit for discovering the latest al qaeda threat by monitoring overseas electronic communications. new information on the global terror threat. >> the terror threat continues. >> that is keeping more than a dozen u.s. embassies and consulates closed. >> we're going to keep evaluating information as it comes in. >> for others it was a chance to put the spotlight back on benghazi. >> pen gazi was a complete failure. >> a direct consequence of what we saw in benghazi. >> we've learned from benghazi, thank god. >> domestic politics are definitely driving this. >> the good news is we picked up intelligence and that's what we do. >> the nsa program -- >> that's what nsa does. >> using the threat as a vehicle to advance their own agendas. >> the deadly hit-and-run over the weekend. >> detectives believe he intentionally hit the pedestrians. >> there's more than one party that benefits from me not ever stepping back on the field. >> bob filner is expected to enter a clinic today. >> i saw him place his hands where they did not belong on numerous women. >
to you. >> about time. thank you very much. >>> let's talk about the nsa. another revelation came out yesterday afternoon and it turns out that they have -- they have released additional information over the past -- since 2008 on things that have gone wrong in the nsa collection. for example, there was a redacted page which is unredacted and classified yesterday that revealed that we have collected 56,000 wholly domestic communications each year. so this is done, nothing was necessarily done with it. nothing was exposed by it. but these were collected and the fisa court judge did not know about it and he rebuked the nsa for doing that and they said they were unintentional errors. >> we have been talking for a while about the nsa, how they're saying trust us, we're not doing anything illegal. the stuff that was declassified yesterday said they didn't break some laws. they violated -- the nsa violated the constitution three times in three years. violated the constitution because they did as brian said go through our e-mails, domestic e-mails, rather than just the foreign stuff. remember
at moscow's airport ed snowden on the move for the first time. the nsa leaker is said to leaving the airport officially entering russia after granting temporary asylum. vladmir putin has made a move. i'm bill hemmer. welcome here to "america's newsroom." you have come back for more. >> i decided to try another day. i'm heather childers in for martha maccallum. snowden has been in limbo at the moscow airport since june 20 third. the u.s. wanted russia to send him back home to face prosecution for spilling secrets about the u.s. surveillance program. instead russia granted him a year of asylum. bill: we wonder what is next. greg palkot live in london. there are a lot of rumors that he could go to cuba or venezuela. what is the latest there, greg. >> reporter: hello, bill and heather. by our calculations about an hour 1/2 ago he left his limbo status there at the terminal at the moscow airport. edward snowden the nsa leaker, is now traveling into russia. traveling to an undisclosed location according to his lawyer. indisclosed because of security concerns. he also, we have just learned, traveli
today has declass fade a previously secret court ruling which chastises the nsa for screwing up even more. quote, mishandling as many as tens of thousands of unrelated and purely domestic communications collected on u.s. soil and without warrants. the court also says it is troubled that this represents, quote, the third instance in less than three years in which the government has disclose add substantial misrepresentation regarding the scope of a major collection program. and, even better, by which i mean this isn't any better, new investigative reporting it from nbc news today, one seriously sobering new detail about that whole story is that even now, more than two months after he started leaking about the nsa to the press, the nsa has no idea what data they took from him, how many documents he took, or what the documents are. the nsa has, quote, poor data organization and poor audit capability and that they have not been able to do a complete damage assessment of what this guy took. and this is who we have given the power apparently or who has claimed the power to monitor your e-m
to use. thank you. >>> big developments in the rising scandal of nsa. rising serious questions about the scope. secret court documents unclassified showing the nsa was rebuked in 2011 for collecting thousands of e-mails that had no ties to suspected terrorism calling into question why the nsa would ever be gathering that info. kathryn harris with answers. hi. >> reporter: these newly classified documents shown two years ago the fisa court determined the nsa collection program violated existing statutes and constitutional protections. in one opinion, judge john d. bates wrote for the first time the government advised the court the volume and information the nsa is collecting is fundamentally different from what the court had been to believe. administration officials describe it aztec call and the bundled communications focuses on foreign e-mail. a bundle communication can be as simple as opening up your personal e-mail account. if one of those messages was the target of an nsa tracking program, all your messages would be targeted because the nsa apparently didn't have the technicalabi
obama appears to be feeling the heat from the nsa leaker edward snowden's revelations about what the intelligence knows about your e-mail, telephone access. the president outlined a four-point plan to reform intelligence gathering, especially as it touches american citizens. >> first, i will work with congress to pursue appropriate reforms to section 215 of the patriot act. the program that collects telephone records. second, i'll work with congress to improve the public's confidence in the oversight conducted by the foreign intelligence surveillance court. so specifically, we can take steps to make sure civil liberties and the government's position is challenged by an adversary. number three, we can and must be more transparent. so i've directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. fourth, reforming a high-level group of outside experts to review our entire intelligence and communications technologies. we need new thinking for a new era. >> as for the times of all of this, the president says the review process began befo
officials are getting trained that once they get these tips from nsa surveillance and other places, they should cover up that the information that they got came from any of those surveillance programs. they should, instead, pretend that they got the information through traditional legal law enforcement means. they should launder the source of the information. these guys did not get the information through traditional law enforcement means, they got it from the thing we've all been thinking they're only using against terrorists except they're supposed to be pretending otherwise. eek. joining us now is john schiffman. he's a correspondent with reuters news service. it is his reporting that brought this program to light. mr. schiffman, thank you very much for being with us tonight. >> thanks for having me. >> so how does the dea, a domestic law enforcement agency in this -- operating this context have access to this information that is only supposed to be about foreigners? how does this work? >> well, there are four ways that the special operations division, which is a unit of dea, ge
. that is in the rewrite. >>> and later, the latest revelation about the nsa's capacity to read e-mails. you can't go to school like this, c'mon. don't do it! no! (mom vo) you never know what life's gonna throw at you. if i gotta wear clothes, you gotta wear clothes. (mom vo) that's why i got a subaru. i just pulled up. he did what now? no he's never done that before! oh really? i might have some clothes in the car. (announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. time to have new experiences with a familiar keyboard. to update our status without opening an app. to have all our messages in one place. to browse... and share... faster than ever. ♪ it's time to do everything better than before. the new blackberry q10. it's time. i don't miss out... you sat out most of our game yesterday! asthma doesn't affect my job... you were out sick last week. my asthma doesn't bother my family... you coughed all through our date night! i hardly use my rescue inhaler at all. what did you say? how about - every day? coping with asthma isn't controlling it. test your level of control at asthma.com, then talk to
. look, i'm getting from you, and correct me if i'm wrong, because i have to go on to the nsa, you won't do anything in syria even if they use poison attacks. >> those attacks are wrong. >> bill: but you're not going to do anything about it? >> i'll ask you, is it a false flag operation? what would you do? >> bill: n but if they are using gas i would definitely use airpower there. okay, nsa. i think most americans don't like the intrusion. you want to do away with the nsa. that's what dennis kucinich wants to abolish, the agency. >> absolutely. >> bill: what would you put in its place to monitor communications by terrorists all over the world? >> i'd mick sure that all the existing intelligence agencies were abiding by the law. >> bill: okay, okay. >> the nsa has become a rogue agency. >> bill: i don't have time. only have a minute. say we abolish the nsa. not going to happen, but say obama does it. what would you put in its place? >> we have existing intelligence agencies who could handle this. let's face it, most of this work is being done by internet providers. 91% of the internet t
phone numbers on calls around the country about the nsa the intelligence agency meant to rotech you has -- protect you, has lawmakers questioning constitutionality of these programs. they believe, critics that they're gathering too much information on the american people. others on capitol hill say no, this is for your safety. watch. >> it is not a problem of the fact it is it worked. if you have 99.9% compliance and self-reporting errors these came from internal report which becomes part of an overall ig report. i'm on the intelligence committee. i am satisfied. martha: peter king is satisfied. let's talk to fox news chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge live in washington. catherine, really this is a bipartisan issue. there is across the board opposition to these programs right? >> reporter: that's right, martha. what is striking about the latest revelations both democrats and republicans believe. [sa has not followed the rules laid down by congress. a long time republican critic of government surveillance programs says mr. obama bears some of the blame. >> i think the p
-scale news conference in over three months to try and get out in front of the nsa surveillance controversy he was on his heels over a range of national security issues from his prickly relationship with russia to terror threats from al qaeda and why he still hasn't brought the benghazi killers to justice. >> i also said we'd get bin laden and didn't get him in 11 months. so we have informed, i think, the public there's a sealed indictment. >> reporter: the president was referring to the fact that u.s. officials earlier this week revealed the justice department filed its first criminal charges against an unknown number of people believed to be involved in benghazi, which the president vowed to get to the bottom of last september 12th. >> we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attacked our people. >> reporter: pressed by fox today on whether his administration is close to having suspects in custody, mr. obama's body language hinted they are. >> i will leave it at that. but -- this remains a top priority for us. anybody who attacks americans, anybody who kill
-- >> the philosophical objection to all the nsa programs is that you don't want the government. everyone knows that amazon has all of your information. so does, you know, your online grocer who takes your food order every week. this is about the federal government having too much information and too much control over their lives. >> like they don't have it already. >> as a stout nra member, i'm upset to know they may know what i'm doing, how i'm doing, what i'm doing with i many guns. >> where you keep them in your east hampton cottage. >> east hampton, it's ammo city out there. >> yes, i just heard from someone, a concerned viewer that when we say guns, we're not talking about your biceps. >> oh, there you go. >> okay. talking of surveillance. government programs. >> we want to see them today. you have three hours for you to reveal your guns. >> no, no, no. >> this is marketing. marketing is for the consumer's needs. obviously there's a consumer need out there to see the biceps. so we will, as marketers, as journalists. yes, that will happen at 8:00. >> it won't. i promise you, it really won'
and we're going to take a look at what's happened at the nsa and whether that changes any minds about collecting data. >> and a little politics as well. >> we'll have a lot of politics. >> coming up, a huge decision for major league baseball. could it change america's favorite pastime as we know it? i'll ask the radio voice of the los angeles dodgers, charlie steiner. plus a major new york city bridge engulfed in heavy black smoke. we're going to tell you what caused it and just how serious it is. stay with us. you're "the situation room." and i know the results will be fantastic! find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. ♪ hooking up the country whelping business run ♪ ♪ build! we're investing big to keep our country in the lead. ♪ load! we keep moving to deliver what you need. and that means growth, lots of cargo going all around the globe. cars and parts, fuel and steel, peas and rice, hey that's nice! ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big country move ahead as one ♪ ♪ norfolk s
-line date. n.s.a. employees using their eavesdropping powers to spy on love interests. this morning we have the best n.s.a. pickup lines to share with you like this one. hey, baby, come here often? of course you do. we've been tracking you. "fox & friends" starts now. ♪ ♪ >> this is andrew dice clay. you're watching "fox & friends." oh! >>brian: big come-back in woody allen's movie. andrew dice clay. you been following his career? >>anna: no, i haven't. >>steve: he hasn't had one in years. >>brian: he took time off to raise his children. >>steve: good morning everybody. thanks so much. wait until you see this stuff. if you missed the mtv music awards last night, the video will have you talking. >>anna: she stole the show, miley cyrus. okay, we get it. you're not hannah montana anymore. >>steve: there's alan thicke. >>anna: robin thicke. >>steve: alan thicke's son. >>anna: what is she doing with the finger? >>steve: we're number one. thanks to all of you watching. let's get to a fox news alert. despite the alleged chemical attack in syria, the u.s. is edging closer to a military response
in "newsroom" the latest bombshell from edward snowden. how the nsa violated the privacy of americans like you. thousands of times per year. you know throughout history, folks have suffered from frequent heartburn. but getting heartburn and then treating day after day is a thing of the past. block the acid with prilosec otc, and don't get heartburn in the first place. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. hd >>> happening now in "news room" snowden speaks out saying the media misled by his situation and his father the only person publicly defending his son. snowden says his father does not speak for him. >>> plus, this -- >> from now on we just won't be visiting planets, we'll be staying. >> seriously. the red planet. it's not as far off as it may sound. >>> the size of a raccoon in the face of a teddy bear. a brand-new species, but i'm calling it a teddycat. jeff will come on the show and correct me in about 15 minutes. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning, thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. check
even like it to. talk about the and essays by may agree that they lied to us. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all? 1 million hundreds of millions of americans? >> nosair. john: it turns out the real answer is yes but he lied about it. >> to support the data gathering? >> if you have a problem that people and congress should have a problem with themselves because they write the laws because they are clear in specific. >> it is weird they break up and say oh my god there's gambling. what did they think we were writing these laws for? john: so much other stuff i hate about my government. data mining they are not listening to individual calls to stop the terror. >> i am for the constitution the first time we have seen a general warrant because that is flatly banned by the u.s. constitution. as a practical matter. john: during the time of the revolution. >> came george allow the troops to rummaged the homes under a general war did that was offensive they sometimes still think that is what is happening with our data. john: but it is not. soldiers are not in my house >> because y
of vladimir putin. as for nsa leaker edward snowden, carney said the u.s. does want snowden back but it's not the highest priority of this administration. here's what karn he had to say. >> we had a lot of fish to fry, if you will, with the russians. we have a lot of issues to engage with the russians over. there and is two plus two ministerial meeting tomorrow here in washington and, you know, there will be a host of topics. so this is not the focus of our engage pent with russia but it is not something that we're dropping by any means. >> as to some of those programs that snowden apparently leaked, the "new york times" had a story out this morning that says that the united states might be sweeping up and sifting through more e-mails from people in the united states than what was previously acknowledged. carney said during the briefing that the nsa tries to keep that to a minute month. >> if joe schmo from cocoamoe wants to know if his e-mail is being read, what would you say? >> it's not being read. there are procedures in place, as i just described. i'm sure the nsa can explain to yo
. >> reporter: an internal nsa audit in other top secret files revealed there were more than 2,000 violations in the recent 12-month period, mostly unintentional. the nsa says when mistakes are made, the agency reports the issue internally and to federal overseers and aggressively gets to the bottom of it. but the new report raises concerns about that balance of power. the "washington post" reported the chair of the senate intelligence committee diane feinstein wasn't even aware of the audit until it was reported in the paper. feinstein disputes that, but in a statement admitted that the committee can and should do more to independently verify that nsa's operations are inappropriate and that its awareness of incidents are accurate. and the top judge on the secretive court that approves surveillance programs says judges aren't able to independently verify whether the government violates the law, saying they are, quote, forced to rely upon the accuracy of the information that is provided to the court. critics have been demanding more oversight. >> why is the government spying on its own people?
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